Eat With Joy: Redeeming God’s Gift of Food

eatwithjoy God”s gift of food, professed in Genesis, is in need of redemption for many people. Busy schedules have reduced the number of meals we eat together, and confusing advertisements can make it difficult to choose a healthy meal option. Many of us have complicated relationships with food, feeling guilty when we indulge in anything less-than-healthy. In Eat With Joy, Rachel Marie Stone examines the current, complex issues in the food industry. More importantly, she discusses the spiritual side of food: What did God intend for us to feel about food? How can we use food to better relate to Him? Prayers and recipes are included to illustrate the points of each chapter. Those who seek an improved relationship with their daily bread will rejoice in Eat With Joy. Highly recommended!

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No Oil in the Lamp examines the current energy crisis through the lens of faith. Full of practical suggestions for greening homes and congregations, as well as a thorough exploration of alternative energy sources, this is a great resource for those interested in learning more about the world’s fuel sources. Available at Amazon UK or from alternate Amazon sellers.

 

Making Peace with the Land: God’s Call to Reconcile with Creation

God is reconciling all things in heaven and on earth. We are alienated not only from one another, but also from the land that sustains us. Our ecosystems are increasingly damaged, and human bodies are likewise degraded. Most of us have little understanding of how our energy is derived or our food is produced, and many of our current industrialized practices are both unhealthy for our bodies and unsustainable for the planet. Agriculturalist Fred Bahnson and theologian Norman Wirzba declare that in Christ, God reconciles all bodies into a peaceful, life-promoting relationship with one another.Because human beings are incarnated in material, bodily existence, we are necessarily interdependent with plants and animals, land and sea, heaven and earth. The good news is that redemption is cosmic, with implications for agriculture and ecology, from farm to dinner table. Bahnson and Wirzba describe communities that model cooperative practices of relational life, with local food production, eucharistic eating and delight in God’s provision. Reconciling with the land is a rich framework for a new way of life. Read this book to start down the path to restoring shalom and experiencing Jesus’ kingdom of shared abundance, where neighbors are fed and all receive enough. Purchase a copy!

Almost Amish

“Almost Amish is the perfect read if you’re feeling the weight of our fancy American lifestyle and looking to simplify your life and get back to the things that matter–like family, home, and community.”

-Melanie Shankle, www.thebigmamablog.com

 

Have you ever stopped to think, Maybe the Amish are on to something? Look around. We tweet while we drive, we talk while we text, and we surf the Internet until we fall asleep. We are essentially plugged in and available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Rather than mastering technology, we have allowed technology to master us. We are an exhausted nation. No one has enough time, everyone feels stressed out, and our kids spend more hours staring at a screen each week than they do playing outside. It’s time to simplify our lives, make faith and family the focal point, and recapture the lost art of simple living. Building on the basic principles of Amish life, Nancy Sleeth shows readers how making conscious choices to limit (and in some cases eliminate) technology’s hold on our lives and getting back to basics can help us lead calmer, more focused, less harried lives that result in stronger, deeper relationships with our families, friends, and God. Click here to listen to a recent radio interview with Nancy.

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Reader Testimonials: “I just recently read your book Almost Amish. I’d like for you to know just how much I enjoyed learning about the Amish culture, and how as a modern society we can learn from them. I agree with many of your questions regarding technology, processed foods, materialism etc. Thank you so much for this insightful book. It has not only made me reflect on how to be a good steward of our earthly planet and ultimately our Father’s earthly kingdom, but how to model an example for my children.” — Davina F.

“I want to thank you for the book, Almost Amish. I have had a long time passion for their lifestyle. Not that I live it, because I don’t, but I hunger for “simple”. I am constantly on the lookout for books at our local library for books about the Amish, or just simplicity in general. I am on my third and final renewal of your book at the library because I just don’t to take it back! Unlike many other books I have devoured in a few days, cracked my knuckles and said “ok, what’s next?”, I have really just taken my time to digest each and every chapter. Most things I knew, some I assumed, other things I never understood and just agreed to disagree with the philosophy of the Amish on. Thank you for taking the time to write this. It has been the most fun, and most thoughtful time I’ve had reading in a long while.” —Angi B.

Nancy’s Story
As co-founder and Managing Director of Blessed Earth, Nancy Sleeth travels throughout the U.S. speaking and writing about faith and the creation care. Prior to heeding this spiritual calling, Sleeth served as communications director for a Fortune 500 company and as an educator and administrator, most recently at Asbury University. Sleeth is a graduate of Georgetown University and holds a Master’s degree in journalism. She is the author of Go Green, Save Green, the first-ever practical guide for going green from a faith perspective. Nancy specializes in leading workshops on the nuts and bolts of stewardship practices at home, work, school, and church and facilitating women’s retreats on Sabbath practices, simplicity, and sustainability. She and Matthew Sleeth have been married three and a half decades. They are the parents of Clark (a recent medical school graduate) and Emma (creation care speaker/author for teens and young adults).

 

Year of Plenty

In 2008, Pastor Craig Goodwin and his young family embarked on a year-long experiment to consume only what was local, used, homegrown, or homemade. In Year of Plenty, Goodwin shares the winsome story of how an average suburban family stumbled onto the cultural cutting edge of locavores, backyard chickens, farmers markets, simple living, and going green. More than that, it is the timely tale of Christians exploring the intersections of faith, environment, and everyday life. This humorous yet profound book comes at just the right time for North American Christians, who are eager to engage the growing interest in the environmental movement and the quandaries of modern consumer culture. For more information, check out Rev. Goodwin”s blog at www.yearofplenty.org or purchase a copy.

 

Go Green, Save Green

Many people want to “go green” but put it off because they believe it’s too time consuming and too expensive. Not so! Nancy Sleeth and her family have been living an eco-friendly lifestyle for years saving both time and money.

Now, for the first time, she divulges hundreds of practical, easy-to-implement steps that you can take to create substantial money savings while protecting the earth. Sleeth also demonstrates how going green helps people live more God-centered lives by becoming better stewards of financial and natural resources.

Chapter titles include: (1) Home; (2) Lawn and Garden; (3) Work; (4) Transportation; (5) Food; (6) Sabbath; (7) Holidays; (8) Entertainment; (9) School; (10) Church; (11) Nature; and (12) Community. Published by Tyndale House.

Purchase a copy!

Serve God, Save the Planet

Not long ago, J. Matthew Sleeth had a fantastic life and a great job as chief of the medical staff at a large hospital. He was living the American dream—until he saw an increasing number of his patients suffering from cancer, asthma, and other chronic diseases. He began to suspect that the Earth and its inhabitants were in deep trouble.

Turning to Jesus for guidance, Sleeth discovered how the scriptural lessons of personal responsibility, simplicity, and stewardship could be applied to modern life. The Sleeths have since sold their big home and given away more than half of what they once owned. In Serve God, Save the Planet, Sleeth shares the joy of adopting a less materialistic, healthier lifestyle, stronger relationships, and richer spiritual lives. With the storytelling ease of James Herriot and the logical clarity of C. S. Lewis, Sleeth lays out the rationale for environmentally responsible life changes and a how-to guide for making those changes. Purchase a copy!

It’s Easy Being Green

You’ve probably heard the story of the garden of Eden—the paradise that God created for humans to live in. There was plenty of room for everyone, there were trees and flowers and plenty of food. When you look out your window today you don’t see the paradise God intended for us. This world is crowded, polluted, and headed for trouble.

But it’s not hopeless. Emma Sleeth is only sixteen, and she’s working hard to save our planet. She believes that we’re called by God to protect the resources that he gave us, and she wants to help you learn how to live a sustainable lifestyle. She’s speaking out to her generation in the hopes that you will be the ones who can end global warming and restore our world to the paradise that God desires for us.

In It’s Easy Being Green you’ll learn how to honor God in the choices you make and you’ll begin to understand the impact those choices have on the environment. Emma will help you see how you can make a difference at school, around the house, and all over the world as you make choices about everything from transportation to food to clothes.

Imagine the kind of paradise you can help to create for the next generation—for your future children! Join Emma on the quest to serve God by saving the planet. Purchase a copy!

 

Hope for Creation Guidebook

In this interactive companion to the Hope for Creation DVD, Dr. Matthew Sleeth provides personal questions, practical applications, and additional content to help Christ’s followers dig deeper into the creation care lessons of Sessions 1-6—Light, Water, Soil, Heavens, Animals, and Man.

Hope for Humanity Guidebook

In this interactive companion to the Hope for Humanity DVD, Dr. Matthew Sleeth provides personal questions, practical applications, and additional content to help Christ’s followers dig deeper into the creation care actions highlighted in Sessions 7-12—Rest, Work, Give, Share, Teach, and Hope.

The Green Bible

Read the scriptures anew with The Green Bible as your guide. With its eco-friendly materials, Green Trail Guide, topical index and inspirational essays, discover how caring for the earth is not only a calling, but a lifestyle. The Green Bible will equip and encourage you to see God”s vision for creation and help you engage in the work of healing and sustaining it. This first Bible of its kind includes inspirational essays from key leaders such as N. T. Wright, Barbara Brown Taylor, Brian McLaren, Matthew Sleeth, Pope John Paul II, and Wendell Berry. As you read the scriptures anew, The Green Bible will help you see that caring for the earth is not only a calling, but a lifestyle. Purchase a copy!

Pollution and the Death of Man

The Bible is clear: mankind was meant to exercise godly domination over the earth. Yet today men mine valuable resources by whatever method brings the greatest profit in the shortest time, leaving the earth ravaged. They hunt and fish for pleasure, not food, leaving animal carcasses behind to rot. They worship self and ignore the God who made them.

The answer to the ecological crises of our day is found only in the glorious truths of biblical Christianity: God created ex nihilo; He is both infinite and personal; we are made in His image and thus have great value in Him; Christ”s death brought redemption from the consequences of the Fall (for believing individuals now and for all creation when He returns).

There are indeed serious ecological crises in our world, but, says Dr. Francis A. Schaeffer, one of the greatest Christian thinkers of our time: “The Christian who believes the Bible should be the man who–with God”s help and in the power of the Holy Spirit–is treating nature now in the direction of the way nature will be [when Christ returns]…. God”s calling to the Christian now, and to the Christian community, in the area of nature… is that we should exhibit a substantial healing here and now.”

A powerful Christian classic–a marvelous theological response to ecological danger signals.

For the Beauty of the Earth

Thomas Aquinas once stated that “any error about creation also leads to an error about God.” At a time when it seems humans have erred much in their treatment of the planet, this book explores the relationship between Christianity and the natural world in the most thorough evangelical treatment available on a theology of creation care. An esteemed scholar of ecology and theology, Steven Bouma-Prediger claims that “authentic Christian faith requires ecological obedience.” This substantive yet accessible book argues that true Christianity acknowledges the responsibility and privilege Christians have been given as stewards of the earth. Sure to provoke dialogue, For the Beauty of the Earth will be welcomed by professors and students of theology, ecology, and contemporary culture.

Earth-Wise

Earthwise is about living in harmony with the natural world around us—and sharing the joy of this living. Sadly, our ways of life in today”s global economy have led to increasing land and habitat destruction, pollution, species extinction, buildup of “greenhouse gases,” and other degradations of the earth. But rather than grovel and wring our hands in despair, lifelong creation care scientist Calvin B. DeWitt suggests we discover a joyful, positive attitude about working together for good in this world. Looking forward in hope, we can make changes and take positive, lasting action that is more in harmony with the way the world works and is meant to be. This book, now in its third edition, helps to provide us and our friends, neighbors, coworkers, and fellow citizens with practical information and ideas to become truly “earthwise.”

Green Like God

Imagine God recycling bottles and planting trees. In this book by faith and culture writer Jonathan Merritt, God is honored as the ultimate environmentalist who restores and loves His own creation. Evangelical Christians are less supportive of environmental causes than other groups, a statistic that Merritt attributes to misinformation and politics that hamper understanding. Through a compilation of scripture, statistics, and his own anecdotes, Merritt explains that creation care is a shared moral obligation—not a political viewpoint or a film by Al Gore. The world is God”s apologetic about Himself; it is the Christian”s job to maintain its beauty and complexity. Merritt arms the reader with Bible verses commanding care for creation; resources and suggestions for green living are given in the appendixes. Himself a convert to the idea of God as green, Merritt is sure to appeal to the hearts of even the most polarized Christians. His guide could be turned into relevant sermon material and should be mandatory reading for churchgoers. Purchase a copy!

Tending to Eden

Tending to Eden: Environmental Stewardship for God’s People offers a global perspective on the theological foundation for caring for the earth and its people. Throughout the book, Plant With Purpose Executive Director Scott Sabin recounts his personal journey of helping the poor and the environment and brings the reader into poor rural communities in Haiti, Mexico, Tanzania, Burundi, the Dominican Republic, and Thailand through compelling language and eloquent story telling. The book also includes a creation care study guide which is perfect for a group Bible study. Purchase a copy!

 

Redeeming Creation

Combining compelling stories with both biblical and scientific investigation, Redeeming Creation addresses the ecological crisis we face today.

  • population explosion
  • rain forests stripped bare
  • destruction of animal habitat
  • the death of entire species
  • depletion of the ozone layer
  • global warming

The authors, four biologists and teachers, believe that we can face these dilemmas with hope. Moving beyond a mere survey of the planet”s ills, they bring Scripture into fruitful dialogue with current scientific findings and commitments. They both inspire and inform our individual and corporate response to God”s creation.

Green Revolution

We are facing planet-sized challenges. Climate change and environmental crises can be pretty immobilizing, and we can fall into the temptation of thinking that we can”t make a difference. But it”s not just about what we can do on our own to make a difference. It”s about what we can do when we mobilize together as a movement and combine for community action.

Ben Lowe calls the present generation to come together and care for the earth in a way that recent generations have not. Telling real-life stories of community organizing on college campuses across the nation, Lowe shows us that little things can make a big difference when we all work together. We now have an opportunity to show the world what it looks like when Christians care for the planet God gave us, so that future generations can live sustainably. This is our moment. This is our issue. Come join the green revolution.

Sex, Economy, Freedom & Community

In eight visionary or polemical essays, Berry sounds the themes of decentralization, renewal of community and ecological awareness that inform his previous books. Assailing the U.S. government”s role in the Persian Gulf War, the Kentucky poet/farmer/conservationist calls for the creation of a peace academy and urges Americans to “waste less, spend less, use less, want less, need less.” He condemns the Reagan and Bush administrations” international trade policies that, in Berry”s view, bring many nations” health and safety standards under the influence of agribusiness. Although he is critical of smoking, his strained defense of U.S. governmental assistance to tobacco growers who agree to limit production may gladden cigarette smokers and anger their opponents. In the title essay, Berry interprets the charges made by Anita Hill at Clarence Thomas”s confirmation hearing as a symptom of community disintegration, then goes on to consider sexual candor and community limits on free speech.